2015 Moments Pt 2 (The Rest of the World)

As I mentioned in Part 1 of this post, this is really a nutshell of moments in 2015. Not included in here are visits to Sydney, a LOT of surfing photos from Snapper Rocks and the Gold Coast, Noosa Heads and Darwin, the New Zealand Coromandel, walking the streets of Bangkok, rock shows in Finland and more Great Lake surfing in Canada. But you can see most of those photos by scrolling through my Facebook Page timeline or my Instagram feed. In the meantime, we pick up my favourite moments of 2015 on the mainland, Australia.

Gold Coast Sunrises

Saturday, May 16, 2015

Saturday, May 16, 2015 – Snapper Rocks, Queensland, Australia – I was pretty lucky to have two of my best friends from Canada living a block from this famous surf break. Coffee walks to check the surf and watch the sunrise were happening daily. This was one of my fav’s from my stint on the Gold Coast. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Sunrise with Kangaroos 

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May 25, 2015 – Cape Hillsborough National Park, Queensland, Australia – Everyday these kangaroos come down to the beach here at sunrise. Camping a few metres from the ocean and then walking along the beach to see the sun rise with these guys hoping around was pretty special. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

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May 25, 2015 – Cape Hillsborough National Park, Queensland, Australia – Another angle from the same morning. (Tiina Ruuska Photo)

The Whitsundays

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May 26, 2015 – Whitsunday Island, Queensland, Australia – This is pretty much your standard postcard/tourist photo from the lookout of Whitehaven Beach. But spending 2 days in Airlie Beach snorkelling, walking on the white beaches and touring Whitsundays was definitely one something that comes to mind when thinking of the places I saw last year. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Touring Myanmar

June 12 - Mandalay, Myanmar

June 12, 2015 – Mandalay, Myanmar – Every day at 4:00am there is a ceremonial washing of the Buddha’s golden face at the Mahamuni Buddha Temple. I had to pay the front desk attendant where I was staying to take me across the city on the back of his motorbike, sans-helmet, at 3:30 in the morning ripping through dark alleys and streets of the city to get to the temple. He waited for me while I took photos and drove me back. I was the only white person there, and there was a gate where monks and certain people (men only) could get closer to the Buddha and pray, but there was also a security guard. An elderly monk dressed in white motioned to me to come with him, so I did – the security guard wasn’t about to let me past, but the monk said something to him in a Burmese dialect and they let me through, where the monk led me right to the front and centre of the Buddha to take photos.

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June 16, 2015 – Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar – A long necked woman weaves clothing in a shop on Inle Lake. There are many different tribes in Myanmar, and some of them still have women who wear heavy brass rings around their necks, wrists and ankles. The older the woman, the more rings they wear. The rings stay on their neck for life, as they can no longer support the weight of their head if they were removed. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

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June 17, 2015 – Yangon, Myanmar – Young monks pose for a photo at the Shwedagon Pagoda, the most sacred Buddhist pagoda in Myanmar. Having never really been to any other Asian country before, everything in Myanmar was so new to me, the entire visit was full of new experiences and learning about a different culture.  (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Visiting Finland

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July 13, 2015 – Helsinki, Finland – I was pretty excited to go to Europe for the first time in my life this year, and going to places like Finland and Estonia were especially cool to see. Taken in the forest, well away from the city centre of Helsinki, I like that this is a different view of the cathedral – the city’s most well-known landmark – than most people would see. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Grand Bend Sunsets and Paddleboarding

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July 29, 2015 – Grand Bend, Ontario, Canada – If you look up the top sunsets in the world, chances are Grand Bend might come up in the top 10. After being away for three years, it was pretty amazing to be back with old friends and get out on Lake Huron for some sunset paddles. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Perseid Meteor Shower

August 13 Meteor Shower

August 13, Grand Bend, Ontario, Canada –  Still just happy to be back on the beach and hanging out with friends I hadn’t seen in three years, we went down to the beach to watch the Perseid meteor shower. I don’t think  I have seen so many shooting stars in one night. With a little bit of planning and a little bit of luck, I got this shot of a star shooting into the Big Dipper. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Great Lake Surfing

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September 19, 2015 – Kincardine, Lake Huron, Ontario, Canada – People often find it hard to believe we surf here in Canada on the lakes. Well here is the proof, as my buddy JP White drops into a pretty decent looking wave on Lake Huron this past September. I enjoy shooting any surfing, but especially surf missions with old friends on the lake. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

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September 19, 2015 – Mother Nature usually puts on a pretty good show at the end of the night, too. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Fall in Ontario

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October 25, 2015 – Somewhere in rural Ontario, Canada – Having four seasons is something that I really enjoy, and also something I missed a little bit during the last couple years (1 full year of winter followed by a full year of summer). Being home for this was very refreshing to see. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

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October 25, 2015 – Windmill Lake, Bayfield, Ontario, Canada – Another fall shot I liked from this year, taken at Windmill Lake Wake & Eco Park. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Riding Powder in Revelstoke

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December 16, 2015 – Revelstoke, BC, Canada – I had missed two winters in this place, but one thing is certain, the mountain hasn’t changed, and riding with friends will never get old. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

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December 16, 2015 – Revelstoke, BC, Canada – Dan Herrick rippin’ it up. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

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December, 2015 – Revelstoke, BC, Canada – The Columbia River, Mt Mackenzie and Mt Cartier. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

 

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2015 Moments Pt 1 (Tasmania)

It’s not every year that I look back upon and think, ‘yeah, that was a pretty great year’.  I have never made a ‘best of the year’ post before through any social media outlet.  But not every year has been like my past year.

Never before had I rode on a moped in South-East Asia in +40C heat to look at ancient temples or floated through entire towns built on stilts on a lake. Nor had I ever lived ocean-front for a summer in Tasmania before. In previous years I had never been to Europe, let alone Northern Europe, experienced a Finnish sauna or walked through cobble-stone roads from medieval times in Estonia.

But 2015 was different. From snowboarding in the New Zealand Southern Alps to scuba diving on the Great Barrier Reef in Australia and surfing on the Great Lakes in Canada, I am fortunate that 2015 is chalk-full of stories and adventures for me.

So for the first time I am posting not my ‘best photos of 2015’, but some of my favourite memories that I captured through my lens. Not all of them are necessarily my best photos of the year, and for some people they might not be that great at all. But for one reason or another, they stick out when I think back on 2015. So here they are – I hope you enjoy viewing and reading about them!

Tasmanian Waves

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January 14, 2015 – Redbill Beach, Bicheno, Tasmania, Australia –  I had been in Tassie about a month when I took this photo. It was the first day I had gone out to take photos of surfers in Tasmania. They weren’t the biggest waves I had ever seen, but I remember standing on the rocks looking at the surrounding landscape, feeling the water temperature and seeing the sheer power of the ocean there. I couldn’t believe where I actually was geographically, so far from the crowds of mainland Australia beaches. Everything about it was impressive. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

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January 14, 2015 – Redbill Beach, Bicheno, Tasmania, Australia – Also impressive was that many of the surfers out there that day were groms. The future of surfing in Tassie looks good! (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Dolphins Out My Front Door

February 2 - Dolphins

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February 2, 2015 – Waubs Bay, Bicheno, Tasmania, Australia – Does seeing dolphins ever get old? I haven’t had a whole lot of dolphin sightings in my life growing up around freshwater lakes, so I don’t think so! I spotted these beauties playing near the shore from my living room window. It wasn’t the first time I had seen dolphins from my window there, but this day the sun was out and the ocean was calm. I grabbed my camera and had about two minutes to watch them swim right in front of me before taking off around the next corner of the bay. (Matthew Timmins Photos)

Tasman Peninsula

Monday, April 20, 2015 - Australian Fur Seals on the Tasman Peninsula Cruise

April 20, 2015 – Tasman Peninsula, Tasmania, Australia – Taking a cruise with Pennicott Wilderness Journeys through the Tasman Peninsula was another highlight. Seeing the highest seaside cliffs in the Southern Hemishphere was pretty amazing, as was watching Australian and New Zealand fur seals and other wildlife. It was a ‘once-in-a-lifetime’ trip, and a highlight of 2015 for me. The ocean also had some of the biggest swell that the company can safely go out in, and it was hands-down the biggest swell I had ever been out in. Not a trip for those who get sea-sick. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

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April 21, 2015 – Tasman Peninsula, Tasmania, Australia – The next day we did the Cape Raoul hike, a day-long hike that goes through the forest and then follows the cliff-line a couple hundred metres above the sea. When we got out of the forest it was so foggy you couldn’t see the ocean. When we finally arrived at the end of the hike, the clouds cleared for a few minutes this is what they were hiding.  The hike allows you to see areas where the boat cruise can take you, so it was great to see the opposite view of places we had seen at sea level the day before. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

The Neck

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April 23, 2015 – Bruny Island, Tasmania, Australia – There were many top spots to see on Bruny Island and the Tasman Peninsula. The Neck of Bruny Island was just one of them, connecting North and South Bruny Island. From this lookout towards South Bruny, you can see the road that goes along the edge of the water. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Mt Field National Park

Friday, April 24 - Mt Field National Park

Friday, April 24 – Mt Field National Park, Tasmania, Australia – This hdr photo of a waterfall taken during a hike through the park was just one of several similar waterfalls we saw while we walked through ferns and rainforest. Add wallabies chasing each other through the forest and the thrill of ‘maybe’ seeing a platypus, (we didn’t), I recommend going to this park if you get the chance. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Mt Wellington Sunrise

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April 30, 2015 – Hobart, Tasmania, Australia – This was a fitting shot to be taken on my last day in Tasmania. It was freezing cold – after a full year of summer I had gone a bit soft I guess. It snowed up there the next day, and I was not quite dressed for the weather. The view was worth it, however, and was a nice goodbye after 5 months in Tassie. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

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Why I no longer wear a Canadian flag on my backpack

Most travellers have a certain degree of patriotism for their home country. For some, it’s a subtle pin of their country’s flag, or a hat from their favourite sports team. Others might have a sticker on their luggage or some sporting equipment.

But there is one traveller which you will always know where they come from: the Canadian.

We are easy to spot. Even without hearing us speak, you can tell which country we hail from. We are the ones with our flag sewn on the back of our bags, the red and white stickers on our water bottle or sports equipment.

Some travellers proudly sew patches on their bags of flags of countries they’ve visited. But Canadians, we take patriotism to the next level – we only have the red and white flag.

As a Canadian traveller who once had the maple leaf proudly on my bag for the whole world to see, I’ve taken notice of how almost every Canadian I’ve met sports one flag at minimum. I have also noticed how it’s received by others around the world, which got me thinking of the reasoning behind the fad which has been going on for some years.

As a Canadian, there is always the chance of being mistaken for an American. It happens, and I don’t blame people for making the mistake – sometimes our accents are so similar, I wouldn’t be able to tell myself. So stamping your gear with the red and white is one way of telling everyone at the airport you are from the Great White North and not a Yankee.

But if you’ve ever been to the USA, no matter how big or small the town, or even seen a movie filmed there, you will notice one thing: there are American flags everywhere.

After being back on home soil myself after two and a half years of travelling, my first thought while driving past the massive Canadian flag seen from the 401 while leaving Pearson Airport was that our flag-bearing tendencies are as American as Springsteen’s Born in the USA.

Now don’t get me wrong, I am as proud to be Canadian as the next Canuck, I stayed up all hours of the night watching the last Olympic hockey games, I get excited when I meet someone from my homeland and every time I heard a Canadian song on a foreign radio station a sense of pride would come over me.

There was a time when I thought putting a our flag on my belongings was 'the Canadian thing to do'. It still is, unfortunately, but it's not on my bags anymore.

There was a time when I thought putting a our flag on my belongings was ‘the Canadian thing to do’. It still is, unfortunately, but it’s not on my bags anymore.

Few people will argue that Canada is one of the best countries in the world to live in – our standard of living, health care, relatively fair political system and clean water are things many people don’t have the luxury of. Not to mention the stunning beauty of our landscape. But you know what? Many other countries that have those things too.

When I see three guys pull into a parking lot in an old Holden station-wagon with a giant Canadian flag painted on the hood of their car (as I did on the East Coast of Australia), I don’t think ‘awesome, some more Canadians!’ as much as I think that they come across as super patriot chauvinists. Rather than travelling for the sake of meeting new people and learning about new cultures and customs, they bring this pride which overshadows their current surroundings and subjects interactions with people they meet to be about them and less about where they are.

Isn’t the point of travelling to embrace new people, places and customs? Unless you are travelling as a national sports team, putting the flag on your bag is becoming more of a ‘we-are-better-than-you’ symbol than anything else.

Many countries have similar standards of living and all the great things that Canada has, but you don’t see their people travelling around boasting flags on their luggage for the world to see, yet I’m sure they are just as proud of their origin as we are.

I’m not suggesting to not be patriotic, but rather than telling everyone before you meet them where you come from, have a conversation with them (hint, unless you’re an asshole, everyone loves Canadians anyways). Find out where they are from. I’m sure they will still want to hear about where you are from, but at least the ‘we are the best country in the world’ stigma isn’t forced upon them.

Sure, sing O Canada with the Canadians you’ve just met at the bar at 11am to watch the Stanley Cup Playoffs (because that’s what time the game is on where you are), wear a Blue Jays hat or a Canadiens jersey, talk about how much snow they are getting back home or complain about why you can’t get a ceasar anywhere. But stop parading around other countries with our flag in your car window or that patch on your backpack – something that seems more likely our neighbours to the south would do, although surprisingly they don’t – they, arguably the most patriotic country in the world, don’t even wear their flag on their backpacks.

So next time I hit the road, you might see a Canadian flag on my bag, but it won’t be alone, but rather mixed in with flags of the places I’ve been. I might wear a hockey jersey to a sports game, but the only way a stranger is going to know where I’m from while I’m sitting on the plane will be if we have a conversation, and it will be about where I’m going, not where I’m from.

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Broome to Margaret River – Days 18-27 (789KM)

After over 4,850 km’s  and 27 days of living in our campervan, here is my final instalment of our West Coast Australia Roadtrip – being posted several months and several countries later.

After Rottnest Island, we spent a few days exploring Fremantle and stayed at a caravan park by the beach, a few minutes south of Perth. Once we checked out the sights and did a tour of Little Creatures Brewery, we hit the road again and headed for Margaret River. Although there are a few nice spots along the way, we drove the four hours straight to Margaret River and set up camp a few km’s outside of town for 4 nights in a caravan park out in a paddock.

Monday, November 24, 2014 - Margaret River, WA - A kangaroo pokes its head up out of a field on a country road outside of town. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Monday, November 24, 2014 – Margaret River, WA – A kangaroo pokes its head up out of a field on a country road outside of town.  This was taken on one of the drives back and forth between our camp and Margaret River. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Sunday, November 23, 2014 - Gnarabup, Margarent River, WA - Lots of people have asked me if I surfed in Margaret River, as it's one of the stops on the world surf tour. We only spent a bit of time down by the surf beaches, and I snapped this with my iPhone. I'm sure you could spend days in this area surfing good waves, but we spent most of our time being tourists, checking out all the local cheese and chocolate factories and wineries! (Matthew Timmins iPhoto)

Sunday, November 23, 2014 – Gnarabup, Margaret River, WA – Lots of people have asked me if I surfed in Margaret River, as it’s one of the stops on the world surf tour. We only spent a bit of time down by the surf beaches, and I snapped this with my iPhone. I’m sure you could spend days in this area surfing good waves, but we spent most of our time being tourists, checking out all the local cheese and chocolate factories and wineries! (Matthew Timmins iPhoto)

Sunday, November 23, 2014 - Cape Leeuwin, Augusta, WA - The Cape Leeuwin lighthouse sits on the most south-westerly point of Australia. It's the tallest lighthouse in mainland Australia and less than an hour drive south from Margaret River. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Sunday, November 23, 2014 – Cape Leeuwin, Augusta, WA – The Cape Leeuwin lighthouse sits on the most south-westerly point of Australia. It’s the tallest lighthouse in mainland Australia and less than an hour drive south from Margaret River. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Sunday, November 23, 2014 - Cape Leeuwin, Augusta, WA - A little behind-the-scene shot from the previous photo. We took a dirt road up a hill along the ocean to get a better view of the lighthouse. (Tiina Ruuska Photo)

Sunday, November 23, 2014 – Cape Leeuwin, Augusta, WA – A little behind-the-scene shot from the previous photo. We took a dirt road up a hill alongside the ocean to get a better view of the lighthouse. (Tiina Ruuska Photo)

Monday, November 24, 2014 - Margaret River, WA - The evenings started getting a lot cooler down here than anywhere else on our trip. Here's Tiina going through photos from the day in our van. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Monday, November 24, 2014 – Margaret River, WA – Tiina going through photos from the day in our campervan. The evenings started getting a lot cooler down here than anywhere else on our trip.  (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Although Margaret River was always the final destination, we only spent a few days there, and while we could have stayed longer (and even considered staying long-term and working there), we needed to sell our van, and the best place to do it was in Perth. With several people interested in buying it, we drove back to Perth, and after a couple days we had a buyer and we made very quick decision to head to Tasmania. We left Perth the same day we sold the van and flew out to Adelaide, Melbourne and onto Tassie. We certainly didn’t see and do all there is to do in the Margaret River area, and it’s definitely a spot to revisit one day, but as the saying goes, it’s not the destination, but the journey along the way. The destination did not disappoint, and neither did the journey.

A little look a where we left overall, and where we headed on the last leg of our trip.

A little look a where we left from the beginning, and where we headed on the last leg of our trip.

Wednesday, November 26, 2014 - Coogee Beach, WA - Sunset over the Indian Ocean as rain clouds form on the horizon. The lights in the distance are from Rottnest Island and ships. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Wednesday, November 26, 2014 – Coogee Beach, WA – Probably one of the last evenings in Western Australia – sunset over the Indian Ocean as rain clouds form on the horizon. The lights in the distance are from Rottnest Island and ships. This was a minute’s walk from our camp. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

That’s all from our Western Australia travels, but for other shots from there and other amazing places around Australia check out my Facebook page here –>Matthew Timmins Photography Facebook.

If you’ve made it this far, thanks for reading! I’ve been on the move for 5 months and finally now have some time to go through some of my shots, so I’ll try and update a little more frequently!

Matt

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Broome to Margaret River – Days 13-17 (300km)

One of the comforts of heading south for us was the slow decrease in temperature and getting out of ‘fly territory’. Throughout some of our trip, we sometimes rushed hikes, scenic lookouts and our meals to get away from the flies and extreme heat. We had been checking the weather in Perth, and seeing lower temps with rain, couldn’t be more excited to walk around the streets in 20 degree weather with a chance of showers.

But we still had a few sites to see before that; first on the list, The Pinnacles. After stopping quickly in Jurien Bay and Cervantes for lunch and a look at the beach, we headed to Nambung National Park, famous for its limestone formations that rise up out of yellow sand dunes.

Saturday, November 15, 2014 - Nambung National Park, WA - The Pinnacles. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Saturday, November 15, 2014 – Nambung National Park, WA – The Pinnacles. Beautiful, and hot. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Saturday, November 15, 2014 - Nambung National Park, WA - We thought we had escaped the flies for good, but upon arriving in Cervantes, we broke down and bought fly-net hats. (Tiina Ruuska Photo)

Saturday, November 15, 2014 – Nambung National Park, WA – We thought we had escaped the flies for good, but upon arriving in Cervantes, we broke down and bought fly-net hats. (Tiina Ruuska Photo)

Saturday, November 15, 2014 - Nambung National Park, WA - When you are on the road, you come to appreciate things like picnic areas such as this one in Hangover Bay, complete with gas powered bbq's. Well done Australia. (Tiina Ruuska Photo)

Saturday, November 15, 2014 – Nambung National Park, WA – When you are on the road, you come to appreciate things like picnic areas such as this one in Hangover Bay, complete with gas powered bbq’s. Well done Australia. (Tiina Ruuska Photo)

Saturday, November 15, 2014 - Indian Ocean Drive, WA - Somewhere before you get to Perth you drive by this massive mountain of sand. We didn't try sandboarding, but if you're keen, this is a place to do it. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Saturday, November 15, 2014 – Indian Ocean Drive, WA – Somewhere before you get to Perth you drive by this massive mountain of sand. We didn’t try sandboarding, but if you’re keen, this is a place to do it. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Sunday, November 16, 2014 - Perth, WA - We finally made it to Perth, and the weather was perfect on our first day. Here we are walking to the Kings Park and Botanic Gardens. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Sunday, November 16, 2014 – Perth, WA – We finally made it to Perth, and the weather was perfect on our first day. Here we are walking to the Kings Park and Botanic Gardens. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

First on the list to do in Perth was take our van to a mechanic and get some repairs done – the dirt roads of the Karijini and long hours on the highway had taken its toll on our precious mobile home. But the next stop was Rottnest Island, located just an hour off the shores of Perth by ferry. It is a popular destination for tourists and locals. You can stay in one of the few hotels on the island, or just go for the day, cycling, surfing, snorkelling, eating at restaurants or taking wildlife boat cruises.

Wednesday, November 18, 2014 - Rottnest Island, WA - There are no vehicles allowed on Rottnest Island, so visitors can only travel by bicycle, foot or in a tour shuttle. At 11km's from end-to-end, we chose bikes, and toured the island, taking in views like this. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Wednesday, November 18, 2014 – Rottnest Island, WA – There are no vehicles allowed on Rottnest Island, so visitors can only travel by bicycle, foot or in a tour shuttle. At 11km’s from end-to-end, we chose bikes, and toured the island, taking in views like this. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Wednesday, November 18, 2014 - Rottnest Island, WA - Sunset from the wharf outside the Hotel Rottnest, where we spent the night on our getaway from the mainland. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Wednesday, November 18, 2014 – Rottnest Island, WA – Sunset from the wharf outside the Hotel Rottnest, where we spent the night on our getaway from the mainland. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Thursday, November 19, 2014 - Rottnest Island - You really can't go to Rottnest Island and not take a photo of a quokka. Quokkas are marsupials, living only on a couple of islands in WA, with a small protected population on mainland. They are the size of a cat, and look a little like squirrels that we would find in Canada, however they hope around like a tiny kangaroo, and the mothers carry their young in their pouch. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Thursday, November 19, 2014 – Rottnest Island, WA – You really can’t go to Rottnest Island and not take a photo of a quokka. Quokkas are marsupials, living only on a couple of islands in WA, with a small protected population on mainland. They are the size of a cat, and look a little like squirrels that we would find in Canada, however they hop around like tiny kangaroos, and the mothers carry their young in their pouch. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Thursday, November 19, 2014 - Rottnest Island, WA - Even though the weather was still very pleasant and the water still had a tropical look to it, we were no longer north of the Tropic of Capricorn. ! It took some self-persuasion, but I managed to get into the water for a quick snorkel. (Matthew Timmins, GoPro Photo)

Thursday, November 19, 2014 – Rottnest Island, WA – Even though the weather was still very pleasant and the water still had a tropical look to it, we were no longer north of the Tropic of Capricorn! It took some self-persuasion, but I managed to get into the cold water for a quick snorkel. (Matthew Timmins, GoPro Photo)

A quick look at our progress to date. I think we are on the homestretch now!

A quick look at our progress to date. I think we are on the homestretch now!

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Broome sky comes alive

I’ve been meaning to slip this post in here much earlier but time seems to fly when you are always moving around and don’t always have reliable internet, so before any more time passes since the photos were taken, here it is.

I am far from Broome now, but wanted to show a few pics from when I was living there for a few months last year. It seemed last that every month last summer there was some sort of ‘supermoon’. Add that with Broome’s Staircase to the Moon, and its super clear skies in the dry season, and you have everything you need for some great night sky photography.

September 9, 2014 - Broome, WA - A full moon rises over Roebuck Bay in Broome. Only a few times a year, when the full moon rises in correspondence with low tide, does it create the 'Staircase to the Moon', attracting hundreds of visitors and locals alike to view the spectacle. This particular night was both a Supermoon night, and a Harvest Moon. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Tuesday, September 9, 2014 – Broome, WA – A full moon rises over Roebuck Bay in Broome. Only a few times a year, when the full moon rises in correspondence with low tide, does it create the ‘Staircase to the Moon’, attracting hundreds of visitors and locals alike to view the spectacle. This particular night was both a Supermoon night, and a Harvest Moon. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

August 30, 2014 - Broome, WA - The lighthouse at Gantheaume Point rises up into the stars, lighting up the night along the Western Australia shoreline of the Indian Ocean. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Saturday, August 30, 2014 – Broome, WA – The lighthouse at Gantheaume Point rises up into the stars, lighting up the night along the Western Australia shoreline of the Indian Ocean. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Saturday, September 6, 2014 - Broome, WA - Taken at night on a nearly full moon evening, this self-portrait of myself looking out over the Indian Ocean really shows how the moon can light up the red rock at night. Visibility was great for walking around the uneven ground in the dark. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Saturday, September 6, 2014 – Broome, WA – Taken at night on a nearly full moon evening, this self-portrait of myself looking out over the Indian Ocean at Gantheaume Point really shows how the moon can light up the red rock at night. Visibility was great for walking around the uneven ground in the dark. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Wednesday, October 8, 2014 - Broome, WA - Another spectacle to be witnessed in the darkness last year, not only in Broome but all over the world, was the Lunar Eclipse. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Wednesday, October 8, 2014 – Broome, WA – Another spectacle to be witnessed in the darkness last year, not only in Broome but all over the world, was the Lunar Eclipse. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Thursday, October 9, 2014 - Broome, WA - One of the last Staircases to the Moon, over Roebuck Bay. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Thursday, October 9, 2014 – Broome, WA – One of the last Staircases to the Moon, over Roebuck Bay. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Sunday, August 10, 2014 - Broome, WA - Does the moon look different in the Southern Hemisphere than in the Northern Hemisphere? (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Sunday, August 10, 2014 – Broome, WA – Does the moon look different in the Southern Hemisphere than in the Northern Hemisphere? (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Saturday, September 6, 2014 - Broome, WA - This very wide angle 30-minute exposure shows the Gantheaume Point lighthouse again, this time showing the contrast between the red sand and rock and the turquoise ocean. I was lucky to get such a long exposure - usually it is so damp out that after 7pm any photo longer than 30 seconds ends up water all over the lens and the shot is ruined. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Saturday, September 6, 2014 – Broome, WA – This very wide angle 30-minute exposure shows the Gantheaume Point lighthouse again, this time showing the contrast between the red sand and rock and the turquoise ocean. I was lucky to get such a long exposure – usually it is so damp out that after 7pm any photo longer than 30 seconds ends up water all over the lens and the shot is ruined. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

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Broome to Margaret River – Day 10, 11 & 12 (994km)

After a long day of driving from Coral Bay, we woke up to the sunrise the following morning in our cozy campervan, parked in a pull-over area just inside the Shark Bay World Heritage Area. A quick breakfast and we hit the road to Monkey Mia to see the famous wild bottlenose dolphins come to the beach, as they do almost every day of the year. We spent the night in Denham, and after some exploring the next morning, continued south to Kalbarri.

Thursday, November 13, 2014 - Monkey Mia Reserve, Shark Bay, WA - Everybody loves dolphins! Just about every day, wild bottlenose dolphins come into the shallow water at Monkey Mia - a reserve run by the WA Department of Environment and Conservation. The dolphins have been coming for over 40 years, and the DEC feed the dolphins a small amount of food - not enough for them to survive solely on. The dolphins don't have to come, and numbers vary day to day between one and over two dozen. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Thursday, November 13, 2014 – Monkey Mia Reserve, Shark Bay, WA – Everybody loves dolphins! Just about every day, wild bottlenose dolphins come into the shallow water at Monkey Mia – a reserve run by the WA Department of Environment and Conservation. The dolphins have been coming for over 40 years, and the DEC feed the dolphins a small amount of food – not enough for them to survive solely on. The dolphins don’t have to come and don’t depend on the DEC for survival, and numbers vary day to day between one and over two dozen. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Wednesday, November 12, 2014 - Monkey Mia, Shark Bay, WA - The day we visited the reserve, just three dolphins were came to the beach. DEC staff give a little presenation, before picking a couple people out of the crowd to feed them. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Wednesday, November 12, 2014 – Monkey Mia Reserve, Shark Bay, WA – The day we visited the reserve, just three dolphins were came to the beach. DEC staff give a little presentation, before picking a couple people out of the crowd to feed them. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Thursday, November 13, 2014 - Monkey Mia Reserve, Shark Bay, WA - These dolphins sleep with one eye open - as you might expect, there are dangers living in Shark Bay. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Thursday, November 13, 2014 – Monkey Mia Reserve, Shark Bay, WA – These dolphins sleep with one eye open – as you might expect, there are dangers living in Shark Bay. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Thursday, November 13, 2014 - Shell Beach, Shark Bay, WA - Here's a shot of myself walking along Shell Beach. The beach is one of only two of its kind in the world - it is made up entirely of millions of tiny shells. Its water also has a salt content twice as high as normal sea water. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Thursday, November 13, 2014 – Shell Beach, Shark Bay, WA – Here’s a shot of myself walking along Shell Beach. The beach is one of only two of its kind in the world – it is made up entirely of millions of tiny shells. Its water also has a salt content twice as high as normal sea water. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Friday, November 14, 2014 - Kalbarri National Park, WA - After saying by to the dolphins and Shark Bay, we continued south to Kalbarri. Here's a shot from the Z-Bend lookout of the Murchison River Gorge. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Friday, November 14, 2014 – Kalbarri National Park, WA – After saying bye to the dolphins and Shark Bay, we continued south to Kalbarri. Here’s a shot from the Z-Bend lookout of the Murchison River Gorge. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Friday, November 14, 2014 - Kalbarri National Park, WA - 'The Loop' and Murchison River Gorge. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Friday, November 14, 2014 – Kalbarri National Park, WA – ‘The Loop’ and Murchison River Gorge. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Friday, November 14, 2014 - Kalbarri National Park, WA - Nature's Window, probably the most popular photo spot for tourists in the park. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Friday, November 14, 2014 – Kalbarri National Park, WA – Nature’s Window, probably the most popular photo spot for tourists in the park. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Thursday, November 13, 2014 - Kalbarri, WA - A look at how rugged the Western Australia coastline can be. (Tiina Ruuska Photo)

Thursday, November 13, 2014 – Kalbarri, WA – A look at how rugged the Western Australia coastline can be. (Tiina Ruuska Photo)

Friday, November 14, 2014 - It was a very long day, waking up in Kalbarri and heading into the park for a couple short hikes to some lookouts, then driving as close to Jurien Bay as we could get before fatigue took over and we found this spot along the ocean to make a quick dinner under the stars and get some sleep. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

Friday, November 14, 2014 – It was a very long day, waking up in Kalbarri and heading into the park for a couple short hikes to some lookouts, then driving as close to Jurien Bay as we could get before fatigue took over and we found this spot along the ocean to make a quick dinner under the stars and get some sleep. (Matthew Timmins Photo)

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